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  • #76
    Originally posted by JustMe View Post
    Can anyone point me to some source that will tell me how many carbs a DSer should be consuming to prevent weight loss? I'm thinking of counting my carbs they way I keep track of my protein.
    I have never seen anything probably because no one really knows. When I was first post-op I was told to limit my carbs to less than 50 grams per day. As soon as I hit my goal weight I started adding more carbs and just worked until I found a balance in maintaining my weight. I know I eat at least several hundred grams of carbs per day to maintain my weight and most of those are in simple carbohydrates. I also never had any luck with beano.

    Have you tried digestive enzymes to help you absorb more? I personally have no experience with them but I believe others have tried in order to absorb more.

    I hope you find a solution.
    Janet in Reston
    DS 2/25/03
    Dr. Elariny
    Starting weight 320
    Current weight 157

    Comment


    • #77
      "In my last post, I listed numerous foods that contain carbs: milk, cheese, cashews, rice, hot and sour soup, juice, peanut butter, whole wheat bread, pretzel mix, yogurt. Flip over your jar of peanut butter and notice how much fat and carbohydrates and protein is actually in a tablespoon of pb. There's a lot more fat and carbs than you seem to understand."

      Just wanted to say that DS2000 is one of the most knowledgable people on this forum, and cartainly understands much about fats and carbs. But she's also straight talking and maybe it was the rest of her reply that made you feel so defensive? She is right - it is unusual for anyone with a BMI of only 37-38 to have the DS even with co-morbidities (normally a less drastic wls might be advised), so it was a fair question, though of course you don't have to answer it (which you chose not to).

      There are some things you say which do make me wonder about your history, and whether it includes an anorectic type eating disorder? You talk of "allowing" yourself to eat if you wake up hungry in the night - why does that have to be "allowed" at all? You have had a DS and you are losing too much weight, I would have thought you would be grateful of any opportunity to squeeze in more carbs/calories (healthy ones of course!) and yes, even fats, which are absolutely fine for DS'ers as we malabsorb 80% of them. Also, in a couple of posts you talk about snacking "interrupting" your day, and having to "force" yourself to do it. Again, this sounds strange coming from someone who has had a serious obesity problem - I could never see eating of any kind as an "interruption" to anything - before the op I might even have said that life was an interruption to eating, but not the other way round!

      I realise that you have come on here for help, and maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree, but you do seem very resistant to almost every suggestion offered, and unwilling to put us in the full picture so that the advice can be more specific to your needs. But of course I do hope you find a solution to your many eating problems, regain your health and manage to see your DS in a more positive light.
      Last edited by Drewa; August 11th, 2009, 06:25 AM.

      Comment


      • #78
        Thank you, Drewa. It took me a couple of days to come up with the right words to respond, and you did it perfectly.

        DS2000 is truly a wonderful source of information - she's a longtime postop who is always willing to help and offer advice when asked. You asked, JustMe! I am apalled that you would tell her that she "needs to go educate herself on what foods contain carbs and which don't" (something to that effect). I'd be willing to bet she knows more than most what foods contain what. She gave you some wonderful suggestions, which by the way YOU asked for! It frustrates and annoys me when people ask for help, want advice, etc. and then get snappy, defensive and even downright rude because they don't like the advice given. DS2000 was very correct - something has to give. You had an excuse for every single suggestion offered to you. It can almost seem like you don't want things to change, since you already have the answers to every suggestion, or a reason why you can't try something else offered to you. If you're unwilling to seriously take the advice offered, then seek out your surgeon for a revision.
        Melinda (Mindy) from Maryland
        Lap BPD/DS 11/19/2002
        Dr. Hazem Elariny in VA

        Comment


        • #79
          I know that I'm eating 2-4oz of protein every couple of hours. It's better if I don't get over-hungry as then I can't eat very much and then end up playing catch up with my protein. You may want to start adding in protein shakes with your milk. Unjury has an unflavored, it'd help bring up your protein count too so that you could add more carbs/sugar in your snacks. You may need to add more snacks. Your diet mentality needs to be thrown out the door or window. DS thinking & DS math is a new way to eat for life. Sams Club has new protein bars that have 31g protein, but are high in carbs at 40, it's a big bar (red box forgot the name). Also, Snickers Marathon Bars have 20 & 22g of protein - I've only found them at Wal-Mart 6 bars for $6.99. Wal-Mart also has the big 31g bars for $1.85each.
          Chris
          HW 225~SW 205~CW 139~GW 132 BMI 26.3
          DS - Dr Rabkin - Surgery 4/17/08
          PS in Monterrey Jan 13, 2011 with Dr Sauceda

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by Drewa View Post
            "In my last post, I listed numerous foods that contain carbs: milk, cheese, cashews, rice, hot and sour soup, juice, peanut butter, whole wheat bread, pretzel mix, yogurt. Flip over your jar of peanut butter and notice how much fat and carbohydrates and protein is actually in a tablespoon of pb. There's a lot more fat and carbs than you seem to understand."

            Just wanted to say that DS2000 is one of the most knowledgable people on this forum, and cartainly understands much about fats and carbs. But she's also straight talking and maybe it was the rest of her reply that made you feel so defensive? She is right - it is unusual for anyone with a BMI of only 37-38 to have the DS even with co-morbidities (normally a less drastic wls might be advised), so it was a fair question, though of course you don't have to answer it (which you chose not to).

            There are some things you say which do make me wonder about your history, and whether it includes an anorectic type eating disorder? You talk of "allowing" yourself to eat if you wake up hungry in the night - why does that have to be "allowed" at all? You have had a DS and you are losing too much weight, I would have thought you would be grateful of any opportunity to squeeze in more carbs/calories (healthy ones of course!) and yes, even fats, which are absolutely fine for DS'ers as we malabsorb 80% of them. Also, in a couple of posts you talk about snacking "interrupting" your day, and having to "force" yourself to do it. Again, this sounds strange coming from someone who has had a serious obesity problem - I could never see eating of any kind as an "interruption" to anything - before the op I might even have said that life was an interruption to eating, but not the other way round!

            I realise that you have come on here for help, and maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree, but you do seem very resistant to almost every suggestion offered, and unwilling to put us in the full picture so that the advice can be more specific to your needs. But of course I do hope you find a solution to your many eating problems, regain your health and manage to see your DS in a more positive light.
            DS2000 may be a very knowledgeable person, but he/she failed to reveal it when they told me that I need to eat carbs. It was clear that he/she either failed to notice I was eating carbs or that he/she doesn't understand that certain foods do have carbs in them. If this sounds mean or defensive, I apologize, but I was just being straight.

            The reason I talk about "allowing myself" to eat in the middle of the night is because I would never have allowed that in the past given that I was trying to lose weight. Now, I allow myself to do that because I don't have that concern at the present time. A truly anorexic person would not allow themselves to do such a thing even when their weight is low like mine is. Further, a truly anorexic person would not be telling you that they know they are too skinny--they would say they were fat no matter how skinny they were.

            The reason I don't answer the info about comorbidities and why I got the DS is because it is like crying over spilt milk--the DS is done and over with...Period. If I sound mean, I'm sorry, I'm simply talking straight. One last thing: my surgeon (someone more knowledgeable than any of us) is very strict about who he is willing to do DS on and he felt it was the best choice for me and so did my insurance (before I lost it). No matter how knowledgeable you are, please do not interfere in my doctor-patient relationship. We should all be saying that to each other.

            The reason that I talk about snacking interrupting my day is because I am a very hyper person. If I had it my way, I wouldn't sleep, eat, or go to the restroom if I didn't have to--I'm considered the most hyper person at work because I am there before 8, I use to work thru lunch (until they made me stop), and I would work long after 5 (until they made me stop). If things aren't hoppin at work, I get ansy. The reason it sounds strange to you that I felt that snacking interrupted my day is because I wasn't addicted to food the way some DSers are/were addicted to food. Let me give you a bit of insight: people who say that life is an interruption to eating show an addictive relationship to food...that's what alcoholics say about life and drinking, that's what addicts say about life and drugs, that's what video gamers say about life and video games, that's what work-aholics say about life and work (and yes, I am an admitted work-aholic--It's something I am still in the process of learning to control/balance).

            I can see why you see me as resistant to suggestions, but please let me explain. It is not that I am resistant to suggestions, it is just that I am being very blunt and telling you what things I have tried and what will not work with me. Thus, I am asking you for different suggestions, ie like if anyone knows how many grams of carbs I should aim for everyday. If one suggestion doesn't work for me, maybe someone else has a better idea. If my being blunt and immediately replying that something won't work for me has come off as resistant to suggestions, I truly am sorry--I was actually hoping for other suggestions---ones that took into account my likes and dislikes, my things that cause me pain and things that don't, etc. I am actually looking for deep, well-thought out suggestions, not superficial ones.
            Highest weight: 237 lbs.
            Pre-op weight: 227 lbs.
            Height: 5"6' (or 5"4" if you believe my surgeon)
            Surgery Date: 08-11-2008
            Surgery type: Lap DS (includes vertical sleeve plus modified gastric bypass)
            Weight as of 08-31-2008: 210 lbs.
            Weight as of 10-13-2008 (9 weeks post-op): 182 lbs.
            Weight as of 11-15-2008 (about 14 weeks post-op): 177 lbs
            Weight as of 05-22-2009 (about 9 months post-op): 125 lbs
            Weight as of 07-28-2009 (about 11.5 months post-op): 115.5 lbs.

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by jpcello View Post
              I have never seen anything probably because no one really knows. When I was first post-op I was told to limit my carbs to less than 50 grams per day. As soon as I hit my goal weight I started adding more carbs and just worked until I found a balance in maintaining my weight. I know I eat at least several hundred grams of carbs per day to maintain my weight and most of those are in simple carbohydrates. I also never had any luck with beano.

              Have you tried digestive enzymes to help you absorb more? I personally have no experience with them but I believe others have tried in order to absorb more.

              I hope you find a solution.
              Well, at least I have a starting point for carbs. I think I am going to try to count my carbs for a couple of days and see how much I get in and then I will try to increase from there. I was told to limit my simple carbs due to the impact they still have on blood sugar--sugar has done years of serious damage to many organs.

              Other DSers who have had or still have diabetes or are pre-diabetic: how do you handle balancing eating enough carbs but not simple ones.
              Highest weight: 237 lbs.
              Pre-op weight: 227 lbs.
              Height: 5"6' (or 5"4" if you believe my surgeon)
              Surgery Date: 08-11-2008
              Surgery type: Lap DS (includes vertical sleeve plus modified gastric bypass)
              Weight as of 08-31-2008: 210 lbs.
              Weight as of 10-13-2008 (9 weeks post-op): 182 lbs.
              Weight as of 11-15-2008 (about 14 weeks post-op): 177 lbs
              Weight as of 05-22-2009 (about 9 months post-op): 125 lbs
              Weight as of 07-28-2009 (about 11.5 months post-op): 115.5 lbs.

              Comment


              • #82
                I'm sorry if I missed this earlier. Are you still diabetic even with your super low BMI? I'll be interested to see if you get any responses from Post DS'ers who are still diabetic since most find a resolution to their blood sugar probelms very soon post op. There are certainly lists of low glycemic carbs you can eat and you might want to check amazon for some books on it. I know they're out there, I just don't know the titles. Sorry. You can probably google it. If you consult the Atkins diet there are different phases, but it suggests limits to keep carbs UNDER to avoid weight gain. You could use that structure, but stay ABOVE the level so you do gain weight. Also, a last thought, I know you mentioned before that probiotics didn't seem to help but digestive enzymes could possibly help you. I believe they are frequently prescribed for people in your situation.
                JB


                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by MelindaH. View Post
                  Thank you, Drewa. It took me a couple of days to come up with the right words to respond, and you did it perfectly.

                  DS2000 is truly a wonderful source of information - she's a longtime postop who is always willing to help and offer advice when asked. You asked, JustMe! I am apalled that you would tell her that she "needs to go educate herself on what foods contain carbs and which don't" (something to that effect). I'd be willing to bet she knows more than most what foods contain what. She gave you some wonderful suggestions, which by the way YOU asked for! It frustrates and annoys me when people ask for help, want advice, etc. and then get snappy, defensive and even downright rude because they don't like the advice given. DS2000 was very correct - something has to give. You had an excuse for every single suggestion offered to you. It can almost seem like you don't want things to change, since you already have the answers to every suggestion, or a reason why you can't try something else offered to you. If you're unwilling to seriously take the advice offered, then seek out your surgeon for a revision.
                  Melinda, I understand that you are upset about what I said to DS2000. she is your friend and I applaud that you would come to the defense of a friend. Furthermore, you really don't know me so you have no reason to take my side.

                  Please re-read my posts and try to see things in a more objective light--that I am actually here for some suggestions, but that DS2000's post sounded like a rant on me: she stated that "something's gotta give" but failed to see that I was trying--like the fact that I don't like interrupting my workday to snack but that I am doing it nonetheless because I know I have to. Her rant was focused on the past (DS is done and over with) and interfered with my doctor's judgement. I am about to say something very blunt, but it is not intended to hurt any one's feelings, it is simply meant to show how I think about things: my doctor's judgement (that DS is the best WLS for me) matters more to me than DS2000's judgement (that DS is not the best WLS for me). My surgeon went to school for many, many years, studied till the wee hours of the night, had to pass numerous national exams, had to deal with numerous other surgeons (who were his superior) verbally questioning and testing him, and he also knows my personal health history. While I am not saying that my surgeon is a god, I am simply saying that I trust his VERY FORMALLY EDUCATED judgement on whether or not I should have the DS. Further, I suggest that everyone seek out an EDUCATED PROFESSIONAL for advice on whether or not to get the surgery. I don't think anyone, no matter how upset they are with me, can argue with this statement.

                  If I were unwilling to "give", I wouldn't be trying full-fat cheeses to see what I like, I wouldn't be willing to take the time out of my day to snack, I wouldn't be willing to spend time on the internet searching for suggestions, I wouldn't be buying numerous boxes of crackers to see if I like the taste of them and can keep them down--those are not the signs of someone who is inflexible.

                  Not to be mean, just to be blunt: I am not here for you guys to tell me whether you think I should have had the surgery or not; I am simply here for ideas. Some of your ideas may not work for me (and I will be blunt and tell you this) and some of your ideas may work for me (and I will be blunt and tell you this). Please don't be offended if I tell you something doesn't work for me--please see that as an invitation to refine your advice/suggestions.
                  Highest weight: 237 lbs.
                  Pre-op weight: 227 lbs.
                  Height: 5"6' (or 5"4" if you believe my surgeon)
                  Surgery Date: 08-11-2008
                  Surgery type: Lap DS (includes vertical sleeve plus modified gastric bypass)
                  Weight as of 08-31-2008: 210 lbs.
                  Weight as of 10-13-2008 (9 weeks post-op): 182 lbs.
                  Weight as of 11-15-2008 (about 14 weeks post-op): 177 lbs
                  Weight as of 05-22-2009 (about 9 months post-op): 125 lbs
                  Weight as of 07-28-2009 (about 11.5 months post-op): 115.5 lbs.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Originally posted by shrinker View Post
                    I'm sorry if I missed this earlier. Are you still diabetic even with your super low BMI? I'll be interested to see if you get any responses from Post DS'ers who are still diabetic since most find a resolution to their blood sugar probelms very soon post op. There are certainly lists of low glycemic carbs you can eat and you might want to check amazon for some books on it. I know they're out there, I just don't know the titles. Sorry. You can probably google it. If you consult the Atkins diet there are different phases, but it suggests limits to keep carbs UNDER to avoid weight gain. You could use that structure, but stay ABOVE the level so you do gain weight. Also, a last thought, I know you mentioned before that probiotics didn't seem to help but digestive enzymes could possibly help you. I believe they are frequently prescribed for people in your situation.
                    Yeah, I mistakenly thought my diabetes was resolved b/c my blood sugar came back excellent, but my primary care physician (who is knowledgeable in DS and actually encouraged me to do it) told me I was not "out of the woods yet" as my Hemoglobin A1C test was still high even 8 months after the surgery! She told me that I could add in carbs, but to be selective. That's actually hard to do after years of being told carbs were the enemy of blood sugar. I'm actually going to buy another blood glucose meter (mine broke a couple of months ago) and monitor my blood sugar. If it is good or low, I will talk to my PCP about altering my carb choices. One of the reasons my doctors wanted me to get this surgery was due to its research/history of resolving diabetes mellitus type II. Apparantly, there are other factors she wants me to consider, like the years of damage that high blood sugar did to my organs.

                    Low glycemic index sounds like a good idea--I use to follow this pre-surgery! I have books, but since information gets outdated, I think I will try a newer book.

                    It is probably a good idea to combine your idea of doing the opposite of Atkins carbs with the idea of staying above 50g of carbs like someone else suggested.

                    I'll talk to my surgeon about the digestive enzymes.

                    It's so weird--I never ever thought in a million years I'd be researching how to stop weight loss! What a strange and wonderful ride it has been!

                    I'm gonna try to remember to weigh myself tomorrow at the doctors office next door--that and the gym have the most reliable scales. Wish me luck!
                    Highest weight: 237 lbs.
                    Pre-op weight: 227 lbs.
                    Height: 5"6' (or 5"4" if you believe my surgeon)
                    Surgery Date: 08-11-2008
                    Surgery type: Lap DS (includes vertical sleeve plus modified gastric bypass)
                    Weight as of 08-31-2008: 210 lbs.
                    Weight as of 10-13-2008 (9 weeks post-op): 182 lbs.
                    Weight as of 11-15-2008 (about 14 weeks post-op): 177 lbs
                    Weight as of 05-22-2009 (about 9 months post-op): 125 lbs
                    Weight as of 07-28-2009 (about 11.5 months post-op): 115.5 lbs.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      One of the best things about this discussion board is that we DO help each other to question our doctors, and we help each other figure out what is going right and what is going wrong, and how to get the best medical care for each of our situations. Many people here have had bad advice and guidance from doctors or their staffs, and this board is a wonderful resource and support to get help to make sure that doesn't happen, or to mitigate the effects when it does. There are countless threads here about the lousy guidance patients have received from their doctors, and the advice we give each other, based on lots of experience, has proven extremely valuable for many of us, myself included.

                      What does your surgeon advise regarding your excessive weight loss? If you are still diabetic even with such a low BMI, perhaps you should be seeing an endocrinologist.
                      Last edited by DS2000; August 12th, 2009, 08:17 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Hi JustMe:

                        I wish you much luck and success in finding the answers you seek.

                        I just have to say a couple of things:

                        Believe me, I've heard all kinds of surgeon worship before, and everyone things their surgeon is the greatest, the smartest, etc. etc. etc. You know what? Your surgeon is skilled and knowledgable about cutting. That's what surgeons do. My surgeon is brilliant too, I'm sure, but he's never had the DS, he has no clue, really, what it's like living with the DS except by what other postops tell him! They are not the all knowing gods of our universe who will have all the answers about how our bodies will deal with our surgeries. They are surgeons. Period. I know they care about our aftercare, but obviously other specialists may need to be consulted. I am under the care of a hematologist in fact, not because my surgeon isn't capable of dealing with anemia, but he's a surgeon.

                        Secondly, althought I'd love to be friends with DS2000, I personally do not know her nor have I ever had a conversation with her - my post had absolutely nothing to do with "sticking up for a friend" at all. I felt you were unecessarily harsh and rude about her ongoing suggestions and time she took to respond to you. You say you like to be blunt? Well, you might need to filter that a bit so that you don't come across as being someone who seeks out advice, then is rude to people because of their responses or because they didn't say what you were hoping to hear.

                        We are all here for each other, we are all dealing with our DS journies. We try not to take it personal, but asking someone why they had a DS is a valid question for a seemingly "lighweight" to have this drastic of a surgery and thus lose too much weight. If your surgeon was as knowledgeable all about the DS and the after effects as you say he is, why didn't he suggest and prescribe pancreatic enzymes to you months ago? We all know it's supposed to make it so we absorb more of what we are eating, and we aren't surgeons who stay up to the wee hours studying about the DS. Has he suggested lengthening your common channel? Just remember, as great and wonderful as your surgeon is, he may not have all the answers. Granted, your doctors should never be replaced by fellow patients, but you need to be open to the fact that not all doctors will have all the answers for you. I believe we are still in a learning curve when it comes to the DS. We learn much from each other as well. Has your surgeon suggested you meet with an endocrinologist or any other specialists?

                        Please do keep us posted on your progess and I hope you're feeling better soon.

                        Melinda
                        Melinda (Mindy) from Maryland
                        Lap BPD/DS 11/19/2002
                        Dr. Hazem Elariny in VA

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Crazeru View Post
                          I know that I'm eating 2-4oz of protein every couple of hours. It's better if I don't get over-hungry as then I can't eat very much and then end up playing catch up with my protein. You may want to start adding in protein shakes with your milk. Unjury has an unflavored, it'd help bring up your protein count too so that you could add more carbs/sugar in your snacks. You may need to add more snacks. Your diet mentality needs to be thrown out the door or window. DS thinking & DS math is a new way to eat for life. Sams Club has new protein bars that have 31g protein, but are high in carbs at 40, it's a big bar (red box forgot the name). Also, Snickers Marathon Bars have 20 & 22g of protein - I've only found them at Wal-Mart 6 bars for $6.99. Wal-Mart also has the big 31g bars for $1.85each.
                          those snickers bars sound like a good idea. Did you ever remember the name of the bars that you get at Sam's? I'm finding myself in love with these peanut bars that I found at the regular grocery store...they have 19g of carbs and my stomach doesn't react to their carbs the way it reacts to most carbs (vomiting and/or gas and/or wicked diarrhea), so I'm super excited!
                          Highest weight: 237 lbs.
                          Pre-op weight: 227 lbs.
                          Height: 5"6' (or 5"4" if you believe my surgeon)
                          Surgery Date: 08-11-2008
                          Surgery type: Lap DS (includes vertical sleeve plus modified gastric bypass)
                          Weight as of 08-31-2008: 210 lbs.
                          Weight as of 10-13-2008 (9 weeks post-op): 182 lbs.
                          Weight as of 11-15-2008 (about 14 weeks post-op): 177 lbs
                          Weight as of 05-22-2009 (about 9 months post-op): 125 lbs
                          Weight as of 07-28-2009 (about 11.5 months post-op): 115.5 lbs.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by DS2000 View Post
                            One of the best things about this discussion board is that we DO help each other to question our doctors, and we help each other figure out what is going right and what is going wrong, and how to get the best medical care for each of our situations. Many people here have had bad advice and guidance from doctors or their staffs, and this board is a wonderful resource and support to get help to make sure that doesn't happen, or to mitigate the effects when it does. There are countless threads here about the lousy guidance patients have received from their doctors, and the advice we give each other, based on lots of experience, has proven extremely valuable for many of us, myself included.

                            What does your surgeon advise regarding your excessive weight loss? If you are still diabetic even with such a low BMI, perhaps you should be seeing an endocrinologist.

                            DS2000,

                            I'm so glad to see that you jumped back into the conversation.

                            I understand that many people here have had terrible advice given to them by some doctors and that many people here have had excellent advice given to them by some people here. The thing is, I am very traditional in my concept of the doctor-patient relationship: it is my duty to find a knowledgeable, experienced doctor and then it is my duty to be compliant with their advice as long as it continues to be sound. After all, why would I be going to that doctor if I had all the answers--then I'd be the doctor, right? Further, of the many situations here where people were given "bad" advice by their doctor....well, I don't know the doctor's side of the story. Maybe some critical piece of information was left out to the story. Maybe the person forgot to tell the doctor everything. Maybe there was a simple misunderstanding due to some poor communication. I don't know.

                            I do agree with you that this board is a wonderful resource...it is a great supplement to my doctor's advice. I take what I learn here and question my nutritionist, surgeon and PCP (who is dually trained and certified in endocrinology and internal medicine) about those things. Without this board, I wouldn't think about some of these things and go to my doctors with so many questions.

                            My surgeon told me that he is okay with my weightloss as he "hopes and prays" that all of his patients lose more weight than they need to at first. He states that there is a rebound period where you will gain weight due to a number of things such as your body's metabolism adjusting to fewer calories being absorbed, the stomach stretching a bit, and a return to older eating habits. He assures me that I shouldn't worry, although, I admittedly do--I'm a confessed worrier.

                            When I see my PCP (who is an internal medicine doctor) later this month, I will ask her why she shook her finger at me and scolded me for not replacing my glucose meter. I just figured that, since everytime I checked my blood sugar is was pretty good for many months post-op, then that meant that my hemoglobin A1C levels would be good too especially based on the research she told me about the surgery and its success with diabetes. But, sadly, my A1C levels were still high 8months later--I find it baffling. Anyways, it is definitely on my list of things to discuss with her so that I can better understand the situation with blood sugar. I will keep people posted.

                            Has anyone figured out a way to know what carbs will hurt them and what carbs do not hurt? Someone once mentioned toasting the heck out of bread and then smothering it in butter, but it still made me feel very bloated and then gave me wicked gas and diarrhea. However, these peanut bars which have some carbs in them (that I absolutely ADORE) do not make me feel bloated or nauseated, do not give me gas or diarrhea. Is it just trial and error to figure out what carbs work and which ones don't or is there some "formula" others have come up with?
                            Highest weight: 237 lbs.
                            Pre-op weight: 227 lbs.
                            Height: 5"6' (or 5"4" if you believe my surgeon)
                            Surgery Date: 08-11-2008
                            Surgery type: Lap DS (includes vertical sleeve plus modified gastric bypass)
                            Weight as of 08-31-2008: 210 lbs.
                            Weight as of 10-13-2008 (9 weeks post-op): 182 lbs.
                            Weight as of 11-15-2008 (about 14 weeks post-op): 177 lbs
                            Weight as of 05-22-2009 (about 9 months post-op): 125 lbs
                            Weight as of 07-28-2009 (about 11.5 months post-op): 115.5 lbs.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by JustMe View Post
                              Has anyone figured out a way to know what carbs will hurt them and what carbs do not hurt? Someone once mentioned toasting the heck out of bread and then smothering it in butter, but it still made me feel very bloated and then gave me wicked gas and diarrhea. However, these peanut bars which have some carbs in them (that I absolutely ADORE) do not make me feel bloated or nauseated, do not give me gas or diarrhea. Is it just trial and error to figure out what carbs work and which ones don't or is there some "formula" others have come up with?
                              Totally trial and error. Wish is wasn't that way but it is.

                              I realize your surgeon isn't worried, but if I were 5'6" and weighed 115 pounds I'd be worried. Not everyone has a rebound and that can take time. I lost all of my weight within 10 months and didn't start rebounding until almost 3 years post-op. You need to figure out how to add more calories/carbs to your diet. Have you asked about digestive enzymes so that you absorb more? I'm not sure what other advice I can offer.
                              Janet in Reston
                              DS 2/25/03
                              Dr. Elariny
                              Starting weight 320
                              Current weight 157

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                              • #90
                                I didn't start rebounding until after 5 years post-op.

                                jpcello is right - you need to add in more carbs, and you need to maintain a minimum protein intake as well.

                                Eating every two hours is one way to move toward this.

                                Unfortunately, carbs (especially simple carbs) make many DSers gassy and bloated and cause diarrhea. You're in a bad spot - you need the carbs now but they make you gassy. Try beano - it helps for some people.

                                Ask about taking some digestive enzymes.

                                Are you taking a probiotic? That may help too.

                                And find out for sure what the situation is with your diabetes, because that will play a role too. For now I would suggest that you get your protein in and then focus on complex carbohydrates, eating every two hours. This will help you eat more and also keep you blood sugar even.

                                How is your iron level? Ferritin, etc?
                                Last edited by DS2000; August 13th, 2009, 10:54 AM.

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